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WELCOME TO THE PMPG

The PMPG is a special interest group of the South African Society of Physiotherapists. The group was formed at the end of 2009 to provide a forum for people who have an interest in pain. As pain is common to many different areas, it means that it will be a very diverse group of people who are likely to be part of this initiative. There are many problems that have been identified in the management of pain both at the acute and chronic levels and our hope is that this forum will become a space for the sharing of experiences, the study of evidence-based pain interventions and process and for help in the application of new skills into clinical practice.

 

PMPG PATIENT RESOURCES

PMPG Poster  Ad

 

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WHAT OUR MEMBERS ARE UP TO

The Happiness Trap

We have distributed 50 copies of The Happiness Trap to libraries accross SA! Thank you to the members always so willing to help with this project. 

 Painful Yarns Book

 In 2014 we distributed 64 copies of "Painful Yarns" by Lorimer Moseley to libraries accross the country. 

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Pain Course Schedule 2018

The Certificate in Pain Management course dates for 2018 are available at the below link:

 

Course Calendar 2018

NEWSFEED: BODY IN MIND

Body in Mind

Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain
  • Body in Mind A couple of weeks ago, I had a mock interview for a new research fellowship with our national research council. In my rather sheltered life, these interviews are a rather big deal – whether or not I am to remain a government-funded medical researcher hangs on the line and the chances are intimidatingly thin. The […] The post Some good news for America’s Back Pain Problem? appeared first on Body in Mind.

  • Body in Mind A team of researchers, physicians, and computer scientists at Penn’s Center for Health Care Innovation have explored the various ways in which social media data can be used to investigate some of the most pressing issues in medicine. Some topics investigated include inequality in medical outcomes among different populations, trends among people with different medical […] The post Yelp Offers New Insights into the Pain Management Experiences of Patients and Caregivers appeared first on Body in Mind.

  • Body in Mind Contextual factors play a critical role in musculoskeletal pain[1] and consequently also pain related disability[2]. This is demonstrated powerfully in the compensation arena. The compensable context is associated with comparatively inferior outcomes, including poorer responses to interventions[3-5]. In a circular argument, the context itself is commonly blamed for the inconsistent results in this group. In the […] The post Models of Care In Musculoskeletal Pain Management – Should We Be Learning From The Compensation ‘Comparator’ Group? appeared first on Body in Mind.

  • Body in Mind Over the past ten years a number of articles have been written detailing the success of researchers in understanding the neurobiology of pain. Over this same period, however, little progress has been made in the development of new long-term interventions for the treatment of chronic pain. Perhaps the most compelling commentary on this topic is […] The post The Challenges of Translational Pain Research appeared first on Body in Mind.

  • Body in Mind How do we know whether a patient is likely to do well in the psychologically-based treatment we offer them? The truth is, at least for the moment, we don’t. At least not in any way that is evidence-based or precise. If you work clinically and are anything like me, this might sit rather uncomfortably. I […] The post Who responds well to psychologically-based treatments for chronic pain? appeared first on Body in Mind.

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