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WELCOME TO THE PMPG

The PMPG is a special interest group of the South African Society of Physiotherapists. The group was formed at the end of 2009 to provide a forum for people who have an interest in pain. As pain is common to many different areas, it means that it will be a very diverse group of people who are likely to be part of this initiative. There are many problems that have been identified in the management of pain both at the acute and chronic levels and our hope is that this forum will become a space for the sharing of experiences, the study of evidence-based pain interventions and process and for help in the application of new skills into clinical practice.

 

PMPG PATIENT RESOURCES

PMPG Poster  Ad

 

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WHAT OUR MEMBERS ARE UP TO

The Happiness Trap

We have distributed 50 copies of The Happiness Trap to libraries accross SA! Thank you to the members always so willing to help with this project. 

 Painful Yarns Book

 In 2014 we distributed 64 copies of "Painful Yarns" by Lorimer Moseley to libraries accross the country. 

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Pain Course Schedule 2019

The Certificate in Pain Management course dates for 2019 are available at the below link:

 

Course Calendar 2019

NEWSFEED: BODY IN MIND

Body in Mind

Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain
  • Body in Mind Now the paper is actually called “Has aerobic exercise effect on pain perception in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain?  A randomised controlled, clinical trial” and I confess I did have to read the title several times to get my head around it, but I was instantly intrigued. What do we […] The post Aerobic exercise and pain perception in people with headache – what’s the latest? appeared first on Body in Mind.

  • Body in Mind As physios we spend much of the working day talking with patients (and colleagues!) and consider it one of our core skills, whatever field we work in. These interactions are unique and personal, and have the ability to make or break the outcome of any and every treatment.  If communication is the most important skill […] The post Talking the talk: starting the conversation appeared first on Body in Mind.

  • Body in Mind Persistent pain in children is an increasingly recognized clinical problem with high prevalence rates found in some populations. A conservative estimate posits that 20% to 35% of children and adolescents are affected by persistent pain worldwide (1). The most commonly reported pain problems in children and adolescents are headache; abdominal pain; musculoskeletal pain and multiple […] The post A Journey to Learn about Pain – a book about pain education for children appeared first on Body in Mind.

  • Body in Mind For at least two decades, we have known that for chronic pain conditions there is discrepancy between tissue damage seen on clinical imaging and clinical presentation. You can have a severely osteoarthritic X-ray with no pain, or a completely normal X-ray with severe pain. Despite this disparity, imaging findings, such as meniscal tears, rotator cuff […] The post The disconnect between tissue pathology, load and pain: implications for clinicians appeared first on Body in Mind.

  • Body in Mind Facilitation of central pain mechanisms is proposed to be a potential missing link between identifiable tissue damage and the severity of pain experienced across a range of painful conditions [1]. Clinically, it is purported to manifest as widespread hyperalgesia, due to impaired descending nociceptive inhibition and enhanced nociceptive facilitation [1]. At present, however, much of […] The post How does prolonged experimental back pain alter measures of pain inhibition and facilitation? appeared first on Body in Mind.

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